Hopes of people living on the inter-Korean border about the Trump-Kim conference 0Hopes of people living on the inter-Korean border about the Trump-Kim conference 0

Mrs. Jung-shim, 75, stood in front of her family’s vegetable garden on May 28¬†while talking about life next to the DMZ fence.

To get to the rice fields, Korean farmer Choi Ki-joong had to go through a guard station.

US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un are about to have their first historic meeting on June 12 in Singapore.

Although people living along the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the Korean peninsula have long been accustomed to propaganda radio programs and the noise of gunfire in daily life, they still hope for a foreign conference.

Choi lives in Samgotri village, Yeoncheon district, close to the northern border.

`We are so used to it, this is a daily thing,` he said.

Yeoncheon was the site of many fierce battles during the war, including the `Battle of Pork Chop Hillside` that killed thousands of American and Chinese soldiers.

US Vice President Mike Pence’s father was an American veteran who participated in this campaign, receiving the Bronze Star Medal for his years of service.

The rural area just 60 km from the capital Seoul is still full of traces from the Korean War, which technically has not ended because South and North Korea only signed a ceasefire treaty.

Hopes of people living on the inter-Korean border about the Trump-Kim conference

South Korean soldiers cross a road in Yangu district on May 30.

A group of soldiers patrolled the deserted streets of Samgotri on a weekend afternoon. Along the roadside was a wooden sign with faded letters reading `If you want real peace, get ready for war.`

In recent years, people in this area were forced to evacuate twice, when North Korea opened fire and fired artillery shells to protest South Korea’s propaganda activities along the border.

However, with time, the feeling of fear among the villagers faded.

Many Koreans living along the border also expressed the same indifferent attitude as him.

The village where she lives is on the way to North Korea’s beautiful Mount Kumgang resort.

Recent efforts toward peace on the peninsula may bring tourists back to Ms. Lee’s village, and the store named after North Korea’s capital, Pyongyang, will do better.

Hopes of people living on the inter-Korean border about the Trump-Kim conference

A military supplies store in Yangu, near the DMZ dividing North and South Korea.

If a treaty ending the war is declared, the number of soldiers stationed along the border between the two regions may decrease.

`My business will be affected,` Heo said.

If all goes well, this 63-year-old man is thinking about moving the store to North Korea, because `the military is an important factor in protecting the Korean peninsula.`

`If war breaks out, I will deploy all these military supplies and fight together with the Korean army,` he said.

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By Samuel

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